Effective Conversations: A list of reminders to communicate like a leader

Recruiters have made it clear that communication skills are essential in any field of work. Besides that, if you think about it, there are so many other valuable soft skills that require you to be a strong communicator, such as: persuasion, public speaking, negotiation, storytelling, etc.

Additionally, it has been proven that good communicators are better listeners than most! It’s safe to say these are essential skills for any team to be successful.

“But what if I’m not a people person?” That ‘s okay! No one’s born knowing everything. Thankfully, communication skills can and should be practiced, even if you think yours can’t get any better.

Check these 5 reminders that’ll help you communicate more effectively.

Showing emotion isn’t unprofessional

Everyone wants to “look good”. More often than not, the fear of showing an over-the-top reaction will get in the way of our listening and speaking. Keep in mind that it’s deflating to be around someone who is impossible to impress. Be excited for a co-worker’s achievements and congratulate your team on their success, you’re not being “soft”, you’re being kind.

Not a competition

Another way of killing the joy in any conversation. If someone is talking to you about how excited they are for their next trip to France, telling them “I’ve gone there 4 times and it’s not that great” is not the right thing to say, try to recommend places to visit instead. Making others feel inferior will lead to a failed conversation.

It’s ok to be wrong

The need to be right may emerge from a fear of being disrespected. Or it can come from the fear of being seen as we truly are – imperfect human beings who are flawed and full of inconsistencies and contradictions. Being right does not make you better than anyone else and insisting on it will show off your insecurities.

Let others speak

Interrupting people is one of the most common mistakes to make in conversations and yet, it’s the most overlooked. Be self aware enough to recognize if you do this often in order to “catch yourself” in future conversations.

Don’t assume bad intent

If someone disagrees with you in a conversation that doesn’t mean they’re attacking you and your perspective. Unless they’re disrespectful towards you, avoid being defensive over your argument, it’ll make you seem less secure in your answers and point of view.

 

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